( Nights)

Location

Hotel SB Corona Tortosa is located in the most modern area of Tortosa. Capital of the Baix Ebre county, the city is part of the Ebro Lands region, just a 20-minute drive from the Ebro Delta and the Tortosa-Beseit Ports natural parks.

An ideal location so you can enjoy all of the city’s leisure, cultural and sports activities, nature and the whole Mediterranean. Always close to all your experiences.

Location

Leisure, culture, history and gastronomy, all of them very close to SB Corona Tortosa. Tortosa is a city which inherited its history and culture from the Renaissance. Whether it’s a short break or a long relaxing holiday, don’t miss out on these 5 essential places to visit in the area.

  • GPS Coordinates
  • Lat.: 40.816459º – 40° 48’ 59.63” N
  • Lon.: 0.512865º – 0° 30’ 43.44” E

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Pl. Corona d’Aragó, 5, 43500 Tortosa, Tarragona

How to get here

By car

0.6 miles from the centre of Tortosa and 8 miles from Exit 40 of the AP-7 motorway

By bus

Bus station: 0.9 miles from the hotel.

By train

Renfe train station: 0.9 miles from the hotel.

By plane

Reus Airport: 53 miles from the hotel

How to get here

What to see and do?

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Top 5 essential visits in Tortosa

1.Ebro Delta Natural Park. One of the most important aquatic habitats in the Mediterranean region. A rich diversity of ecosystems with flora and wildlife comprise its natural landscape together with the rice fields.

2. Cathedral. Fourteenth-century Gothic building that hosts the permanent exhibition of Santa Maria of Tortosa, which offers visitors the chance to understand and discover the city’s history.

3. Green Way. A walk along the old train tracks, now a pedestrian area. It goes across different natural settings and local towns such as Roquetes, Xerta and Benifallet for a total of 60 miles.

4. La Suda Castle. The city’s main example of Andalusian Arabic architecture. It gets its name from a Saracen well, a suda, which went down 147 ft. to reach the level of the Ebro. It is home to the only outdoor Arabic cemetery in the whole of Catalonia.

5. Tortosa-Beseit Ports. Limestone massif located between Tarragona, Teruel and Castellón with a rich flora and wildlife as well as many beautiful waterfalls.

31-ubicacion-historia

History

The first remains of Tortosa go all the way back to Iberian tribes. During Roman times, the city was known as Dertosa until it was occupied by the Arabs in 714 AD and in 1035 it became a Taifa Kingdom.

In the Middle Ages, the city became the area’s main economic and social centre and it was during the Renaissance when it experienced its era of maximum splendour, wealth and growth.

This great era resulted in the celebration of the “Renaissance Festival” every month of July, an event which recreates the lifestyle of those times. In 1708, the city was invaded by the Bourbon troops of Philip V and a century later it was occupied by the French, from 1811 until 1814.

In the Nineteenth century, Tortosa became one of the most important cities of Carlism. The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) affected its economic growth and Tortosa was destroyed by the bombs from General Franco’s aviation, later enduring a long and difficult reconstruction.

32-ubicacion-cultura

Culture

Local festivals play a very important role in the roots of the inhabitants of Tortosa. Some of the most important ones include the Sant Antoni Abat Festival, which takes place in January; the Holy Week processions, especially the Passion and the Silence ones; the Renaissance Festival, which takes place on the last week of July and during which the city goes back in time to the Sixteenth century; and the Virgin of La Cinta Festival, the main local festival in which shows, theatre and dancing flood the streets of Tortosa.

33-ubicacion-gastronomia

Gastronomy

The gastronomy of the Ebro Lands is rich and varied, famous for its vegetables and citrus fruits as well as the rice from the delta region, natural honey and olive oil. The wealth of flavours creates excellent fish dishes, in particular those with cod and seafood. There are also many meat specialities, such as ox, rabbit and baldana, which is a local black rice pudding.

Furthermore, the variety of cultures which have passed through the city have left a legacy of delicious traditional confectionary, including pastissets, Garrofetes del Papa and Coquetes de Sagi among others.

What to see and do?

Top 5 essential visits in Tortosa

1.Ebro Delta Natural Park. One of the most important aquatic habitats in the Mediterranean region. A rich diversity of ecosystems with flora and wildlife comprise its natural landscape together with the rice fields.

2. Cathedral. Fourteenth-century Gothic building that hosts the permanent exhibition of Santa Maria of Tortosa, which offers visitors the chance to understand and discover the city’s history.

3. Green Way. A walk along the old train tracks, now a pedestrian area. It goes across different natural settings and local towns such as Roquetes, Xerta and Benifallet for a total of 60 miles.

4. La Suda Castle. The city’s main example of Andalusian Arabic architecture. It gets its name from a Saracen well, a suda, which went down 147 ft. to reach the level of the Ebro. It is home to the only outdoor Arabic cemetery in the whole of Catalonia.

5. Tortosa-Beseit Ports. Limestone massif located between Tarragona, Teruel and Castellón with a rich flora and wildlife as well as many beautiful waterfalls.

30-ubicacion-top5

History

The first remains of Tortosa go all the way back to Iberian tribes. During Roman times, the city was known as Dertosa until it was occupied by the Arabs in 714 AD and in 1035 it became a Taifa Kingdom.

In the Middle Ages, the city became the area’s main economic and social centre and it was during the Renaissance when it experienced its era of maximum splendour, wealth and growth.

This great era resulted in the celebration of the “Renaissance Festival” every month of July, an event which recreates the lifestyle of those times. In 1708, the city was invaded by the Bourbon troops of Philip V and a century later it was occupied by the French, from 1811 until 1814.

In the Nineteenth century, Tortosa became one of the most important cities of Carlism. The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) affected its economic growth and Tortosa was destroyed by the bombs from General Franco’s aviation, later enduring a long and difficult reconstruction.

31-ubicacion-historia

Culture

Local festivals play a very important role in the roots of the inhabitants of Tortosa. Some of the most important ones include the Sant Antoni Abat Festival, which takes place in January; the Holy Week processions, especially the Passion and the Silence ones; the Renaissance Festival, which takes place on the last week of July and during which the city goes back in time to the Sixteenth century; and the Virgin of La Cinta Festival, the main local festival in which shows, theatre and dancing flood the streets of Tortosa.

32-ubicacion-cultura

Gastronomy

The gastronomy of the Ebro Lands is rich and varied, famous for its vegetables and citrus fruits as well as the rice from the delta region, natural honey and olive oil. The wealth of flavours creates excellent fish dishes, in particular those with cod and seafood. There are also many meat specialities, such as ox, rabbit and baldana, which is a local black rice pudding.

Furthermore, the variety of cultures which have passed through the city have left a legacy of delicious traditional confectionary, including pastissets, Garrofetes del Papa and Coquetes de Sagi among others.

33-ubicacion-gastronomia